Increasing Heroin Supply Becomes Increasingly Evident

Reinforcing a common Monolithik theme, a DEA Agent giving a presentation in Baton Rouge, Louisiana indicates that “black market” opiate pills are leading to Heroin use and death. As previously indicated, the increase in worldwide opium production has fueled the illegal manufacture of counterfeit opioid pills and the large-scale theft and distribution of legally made prescription opiates. As if by design, the utter failure that is the war on drugs has perpetuated a drug that was almost dead. But now, in the immortal words of 1993’s Pulp Fiction anti-hero, Lance “Heroin is coming back in a big fuckin’ way.

DEA agent: High cost of black market prescription pills leads to increase in heroin-related deaths
dea-baton-rouge-Terry-Davis

Source: The Advocate
Heroin-related deaths are on the rise in the Baton Rouge area, and prescription medications are the so-called “gateway drugs” to blame for the problem.

That’s part of what Terry Davis, the Baton Rouge-based resident agent in charge of the Drug Enforcement Agency for the New Orleans division, shared at a Rotary Club lunch Wednesday.

The high cost of prescription tablets on the black market drive inexperienced dealers to mold heroin with random ingredients into what looks like traditional pills, and unwitting buyers are ingesting them, he said.

“That’s why these heroin overdose deaths are skyrocketing in our region,” said Davis.

Just three ago, in 2012, five people died due to heroin overdoses in East Baton Rouge parish, but those deaths shot up to 34 the following year and were recorded at 28 last year, according to the parish coroner’s office. This year, there already have been 22 such deaths in the parish, said Coroner Dr. William “Beau” Clark.

The increase mirrors a national trend in heroin-related deaths, which nearly quadrupled from 2002 to 2013, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Two Baton Rouge doctors — Walter Ellis and James Hines — were arrested due to DEA investigations into illegal prescription drug distribution over the past year and a half.

Terry said purchasing illegal prescription drugs can take the hard edge off the illicit transactions.

“I know when I did undercover, I actually preferred buying pills to crack because the transactions were safer, they were quicker and there was less negotiation,” he said.

And one factor to eye might be the recreational use of pills by college students, he said.

“Adderall, of course, is like sweet tarts for a college student, unfortunately” he said, referring to a medication intended to treat attention problems misused by some students for intense studying.

While not all college-aged drug users graduate to serious prescription pill abuse, many do, especially in the context of apathetic or uninformed parents, he said.

“Once they jump that hurdle and become more desperate, we tend to see it more.”

If cold, hard facts are more your thing:

Heroin Deaths Quadruple Across the US

Source: NBC
Heroin use has dramatically increased across the U.S., spreading to groups it hadn’t previously reached, and deaths from overdose have soared, according to a new federal report released Tuesday.

Heroin deaths nearly quadrupled in the decade between 2002 and 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. Rates of abuse doubled among women and went up 50 percent among men during the same time period.

“Heroin use in the United States increased 63 percent from 2002 through 2013. This increase occurred among a broad range of demographics, including men and women, most age groups, and all income levels,” the CDC says in its report, attributing much of the increase to users who started abusing prescription painkillers and then moved on to heroin.

“What’s most striking and troubling is that we’re seeing heroin diffusing throughout society to groups that it hasn’t touched before,” CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden told NBC News.

The reasons are complicated — drug abuse overall is up, and more people are using prescription painkillers. Heroin is a cheap and more easily available alternative to these prescription drugs for people who become addicted to them.

“They are addicted to prescription opiates because they are essentially the same chemical with the same effect on the brain as heroin,” Frieden told a news conference. “Heroin costs roughly 5 times less than prescription opiates on the street.”

Not only that, but cheaper, purer heroin is coming into the United States. This makes it easier to overdose. “Between 2002 and 2013, the rate of heroin-related overdose deaths nearly quadrupled, and more than 8,200 people died in 2013,” CDC said.

Meanwhile the official US policy on Afghani heroin seems to advocate dumping money onto the problem while accomplishing nothing. As mentioned before, just look up pictures of US Soldiers walking through fields of poppy and it will become clear the poppy, the source of all heroin in the world, is strictly ‘hands off’. [Pictures] [More Pictures] [Even More]

Afghanistan: Still the King of Opium

Source: Foreign Policy
Afghanistan remains awash in opium, despite $8.2 billion in American taxpayer dollars spent since 2002 to curb its rampant drug production and trade, a U.S. reconstruction watchdog concluded Thursday.

The country’s own drug use rates remain among the highest in the world, according to a new quarterly report by the congressionally mandated Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction, or SIGAR.

A 2014 World Drug Report by the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime confirmed Afghanistan again leads the world in opium production and for the third consecutive year saw more land being used for poppy farming — a record 520,000 acres — despite U.S. efforts.

But it looks like the U.S. military has had about enough. With 9,800 American troops focused on training Afghan forces and running counterterrorism missions before withdrawing in December 2016, SIGAR reported that the Defense Department will use $2.8 billion earmarked for counternarcotics activities this year to pay for other needs.

It’s a good thing that the US Military has had “enough”. Now shit’ll get done, right? In case any hypothetocal earmarked dollars are starting to make you feel all warm and cozy inside, take a look at how effective earmarked dollars have been in the past:
heroin-price-drug-control-budget-comparison

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s