Documentary: Mexican Drug Cartels are now in the Oil Business

plata-o-plomo-kvia
Cocaine & Crude

From Tamulipas to Oaxaca, Mexican cartels are now engaging in violence and intimidation against oil workers. When they are not in rural areas tapping Pemex pipelines for gas and oil (called Fuel Milking), they are taking material storage locations by force or violence and draining the tanks into their trucks. Apparently, they have learned over time that the Oil Business is just as profitable as the drug and gun business.

Drug cartels are diversifying their business from drug/gun running and intimidation to oil theft, drug/gun running and intimidation. This new business is extremely lucrative and they know this. In fact, there are interesting parallels between the Cartel business model and the model used by upper echelons of various powerful Governments around the world. Control the guns, control the drugs and control the oil. The money will come. Once you control the final point, currency, the world is yours. Until then, it’s a tool for the cartels. This is evident in their popularized saying: “Plata o Plomo”, meaning Silver or Lead. Take a payoff or DIE.

Vice News’ latest documentary covers the Cartel’s new venture into the business of oil theft and it’s impact. If for no other reason, watching this documentary will give you a good idea of the level of fear instilled in local workers and businessmen, even when they have armed Mexican Military escorts. Mexican Cartels are certainly no joke.

Watch the full 20m short, here:

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Mexico’s Narco Televisa Scandal: The Impunity of the Elite

Source: Mad Cow Morning News

Even as he prepares to take office in a month, a mushrooming scandal in Mexico threatens that country’s new President, Enrique Pena Nieto.

Some call it Mexico’s Watergate; the comparison might even be apt.

Like Watergate—which picked up momentum only after Richard Nixon had won the ’72 Presidential election—the Narco Televisa Scandal is heating up just before Pena Nieto takes office.

Watergate had a largely unexplored Mexican connection. The Narco Televisa Scandal has an American angle. Both scandals involve drug money.

 

And therein lies the rub, explaining why reaction in the U.S.—despite billions of US taxpayer dollars pouring into the black hole of  Mexico’s drug war—has been a studied and exceedingly mild indifference.

“It has become known as the case of the fake journalists, read the lead in a recent wire report about the case distributed to American newspapers.

But this is untrue. No one in Mexico—where Televisa’s guilty involvement is almost a given—is calling it that. It is the Narco-Televisa Scandal.

Thousands of posts on Twitter discuss what happened to 18 Mexicans busted in Nicaragua driving a half-dozen satellite TV vans from Televisa.

They are at #Narco-Televisa. On the other hand, at #fake journalists, there is just one. It reads: “I love #fake journalists… You don’t know how to write and wouldn’t know a real story if it bit you in the ass.”

It is a small point, but telling. Continue reading

Mexican Diplomat Says America Pretty Much Invited The Sinaloa Drug Cartel Across The Border

Source: Business Insider

Leaked emails from the private U.S. security firm Stratfor cite a Mexican diplomat who says the U.S. government works with Mexican cartels to traffic drugs into the United States and has sided with the Sinaloa cartel in an attempt to limit the violence in Mexico.

Many people have doubted the quality of Stratfor’s intelligence, but the information from MX1—a Mexican foreign service officer who doubled as a confidential source for Stratfor—seems to corroborate recent claims about U.S. involvement in the drug war in Mexico.

Most notably, the reports from MX1 line up with assertions by a Sinaloa cartel insider that cartel boss Joaquin Guzman is a U.S. informant, the Sinaloa cartel was “given carte blanche to continue to smuggle tons of illicit drugs into Chicago,” and Operation Fast and Furious was part of an agreement to finance and arm the Sinaloa cartel in exchange for information used to take down rival cartels. Continue reading

HSBC Narco-Bank: Too big to fail, too big to go to jail

Source: Mad Cow Morning News
By: Daniel Hopsicker

The big news in the US Senate’s Permanent Sub-Committee on Investigation’s 340-page report released last week on drug money-laundering by London’s HSBC Bank, the world’s 4th largest, is the answer to the question:

Is there a bigger Drug Lord in the world than Mexico’s Sinaloa Cartel Honcho Shorty (El Chapo) Guzman?

Perhaps surprisingly, the answer is yes. His job’s as important at Shorty Guzman’s, even if he doesn’t get the same kind of press. But first, a quick peek at how and why the Senate Report made one thing— as Richard Nixon used to say—perfectly clear:

Crime pays. At least if you’re a banker. Continue reading

15-Ton Meth Bust in Mexico

Source: El Paso Times
By: Stevenson/Perez (AP)

GUADALAJARA, Mexico— Mexican troops have made a historic seizure of 15 tons of pure methamphetamine in the western state of Jalisco, an amount equivalent to half of all meth seizures worldwide in 2009.

The sheer scale of the bust announced late Wednesday in the western state of Jalisco drew expressions of amazement from meth experts. The haul could have supplied 13 million doses worth over $4 billion on U.S. streets.

“This could potentially put a huge dent in the supply chain in the U.S,” said U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration spokesman Rusty Payne. “When we’re taking this much out of the supply chain, it’s a huge deal.” Continue reading

The “Hollywood Head” was a Mexican Drug Cartel Hit

Source: Mad Cow Productions
By: Daniel Hopsicker

 

A Border War cover-up in the Hollywood Hills

 

 
It was a murder mystery made for Hollywood, as well as made in Hollywood…

Two weeks ago, on a hiking trail in the shadow of the iconic Hollywood Sign, a decapitated human head was found in a plastic bag.

It was a moment many have dreaded, when the Drug War raging in Mexico and along the U.S.-Mexican Border finally spilled over into Anytown USA.

The LAPD, the law enforcement agency in charge of the investigation, has apparently been too busy with local crime to realize that decapitation has become a Mexican drug cartel’s signature atrocity.

They announced that until they had a motive, the killers could be anyone.

“Without identifying the victim, and without knowing why this person was killed,  and the people that’s he’s associated wityh, it could be anything,” said Commander Andrew Smith, the officer in charge of the investigation, and chief spokeman in the case.

But that’s not strictly true, Chief, is it? A lot of men kill their wives, don’t they?

Very few cut their heads off.

The LAPD announced they had a 100-person crime team of detectives, criminologists and search & rescue specialists on the severed head case.  Maybe they should get them all in a room somewhere to brainstorm a little. Get their thinking caps on. Ask questions. Think outside the box.

Guys, you’ve got a severed head case to solve. Hmm. Severed head, severed heads… Where are they seeing a lot of that sort of thing these days?

Few noticed the potentially dire consequences.  Police didn’t mention it. Neither did reporters.  Why?

Because there was a cover-up.  Yes, but why was there a cover-up?

Ay, that’s the real question, now, isn’t it?  This is the story of  how it went down. Continue reading

The Destruction of Mexico

Source: Hudson-NY
By: Joseph Bottum

You hardly need to read deep into the news reports about Manssor Arbabsiar to realize what a bumbler the man was. He was attempting, you remember, to enlist a Mexican narco in an Iranian plot to kill the Saudi ambassador to the United States—and all he needed for that plot was a complete misunderstanding of how the drug traffickers of Mexico operate.

If nothing else, Arbabsiar seems not to have realized that his reported offer of $1.5 million for the assassination would not have impressed Mexican drug gangs as a lot of money. But perhaps the thing he most failed to grasp was the chilling prudence these criminals display as they trample Mexican civil society.  Continue reading